No. 452
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
December 13, 2019

Seeing in the New Year.

Jolly sport among the giddy Vassar girls, fun in the forecastle, and a lonely New Year’s Eve on the
December 26, 2016
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Renoir, "Luncheon of the Boating Party" This Friday the 13th Link Dump is hosted by some lucky black cats! The tragedies of Tumbling Run. How alcohol saved humanity. Superstitions about magnets. Turning song into art.  Literally. This week in Russian Weird looks at their Valley of Death. A look at Christmas 1819. If you're going to have a funeral for a doll, best to
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Strange Company - 12/13/2019

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Lizzie’s Old School Chum, Augusta Poole (Mrs. Cyrus Tripp) Shelley M. Dziedzic, October 2019 (all rights reserved) During the hot …

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Lizzie Borden: Warps and Wefts - 10/19/2019

Per the BBC’s report of a Saudi Interior Ministry statement, a woman named Amina bint Abdul Halim bin Salem Nasser was beheaded for sorcery in the northern province of Jawf on this date in 2011. The London-based newspaper, al-Hayat, quoted a member of the religious police as saying that she was in her 60s and […]
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Executed Today - 12/12/2019
Jeff and Joe Soapy Smith buries Joe Simmons The Illustrated Police News April 9, 1892 (Click image to enlarge) oe Simmons was a tall, slender gambler known to many as “Gambler Joe” Simmons, a member of the Soap Gang who managed Soapy Smith's Tivoli Club in Denver, 1890, and Soapy's Orleans Club in Creede, 1892. According to William Devere’s poem "Two Little Busted Shoes," Simmons
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Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 3/25/2019
William J. Elder, aged 61, was addicted to drink and when under its influence was violent and uncontrollable. His wife tolerated his abuse as long as she could then packed up and moved out of their farm in Hammonton, New Jersey, leaving behind her two sons, Robert and Mathew. In 1887, 19-year-old Robert Elder moved out of his father’s house as well. 12-Year old Mathew Elder was still
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Murder By Gaslight - 12/7/2019

It’s the blue hour in “Rainy Day, New York,” a 1940 painting by Leon Dolice—a Vienna-born artist who came to Manhattan in the 1920s. The sun has sunk below the horizon, and sidewalks and buildings are cast in a blueish glow, illuminated by streetlamps, car headlights, and the reflection of rain-slicked streets. I’m not sure […]
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Ephemeral New York - 12/9/2019
[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
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Early American Crime - 2/7/2019
January. | Pretty Stars for the Southern Dives.

Seeing in the New Year.

Seeing in the New Year

Jolly sport among the giddy Vassar girls, fun in the forecastle, and a lonely New Year’s Eve on the desolate prairie. [more]

“Seeing the New Year in,” is a time-honored custom and is invested with many pleasant ceremonies. Our artist has depicted the sailors telling yarns and drinking grog in the forecastle, and the emigrant on the plains wishing that he was home again by a warm fireside. But the giddy Vassar girls are having the best time of all. A genuine jollification is in progress and as the hands of the clock are on the point of midnight glasses are raised in air and the girls drink success in the New Year and wish a husband apiece to each other.


Reprinted form National Police Gazette, January 10, 1885.