No. 463
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
February 29, 2020

A New Wrinkle.

How the fashionable women of “sawciety” get their complexions whit the assistance of a hypodermic in
December 14, 2015
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Ohio State University professor Dr. James Howard Snook was electrocuted on this date in 1930. The eggheaded veterinary lecturer, Snook was an Olympic gold medalist in pistol shooting.* On a site like Executed Today one would presume that sidearms appear with a Chekhovian purpose, but it will transpire that different instruments cause his downfall. Beginning, […]
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Executed Today - 2/28/2020

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Fifty-nine years ago in February 1961, thousands of avid fans trudged through 20 inches of snow to Carnegie Hall to see comedian Lenny Bruce—in a show that was recorded and released in a three-record set, The Carnegie Hall Concert. This famous show, “was the moment that an obscure yet rapidly rising young comedian named Lenny […]
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Ephemeral New York - 2/23/2020

"The Witches' Cove," Follower of Jan Mandijn It's time for this week's Link Dump! Let the show begin! Angkor Wat and the collapsed reservoir. Shorter version: Jack Parsons was one weird dude. Jolly Jane Toppan, the last person you would want at your sickbed. A museum that's pure torture. The mystery of the Breton inscription. The posset: good for whatever ails you. Yet
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Strange Company - 2/28/2020
Beginning on January 1st, W&W will begin featuring fascinating short clippings from the Fall River papers and other newspapers from …

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Lizzie Borden: Warps and Wefts - 12/29/2019
Nellie C. Bailey. William Dodson led a drive of 2300 head of sheep from Kansas through Indian Territory to their new home in Texas in October 1883. A mile behind them the owner of the new ranch, a widower named Clement Bothemly, and his sister Bertha traveled in a wagon outfitted with bedrooms. Pulled by two yoke of oxen, the wagon was so large that observers compared it to a railroad car.
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Murder By Gaslight - 2/22/2020

Letter to Mary from Jeff R. Smith II Artifact #63 February 15, 1897 Jeff Smith collection (Click image to enlarge) rtifact #63 Soapy Smith's letter to wife Mary, dated February 15, 1897 reads, in a large pen hand, Feb 15th 1897 Dear Wife This far on my journey to the North God bless you Jeff Owl Saloon Spokan A quick note from husband to wife, written on Russ House
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Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 2/27/2020
[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
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Early American Crime - 2/7/2019
homefurnitureadviser.com | Absolutely Pure.

A New Wrinkle.

A New Wrinkle

How the fashionable women of “sawciety” get their complexions whit the assistance of a hypodermic injection. [more]

A New Way to Color the Cheeks. Avery clever Philadelphia lady and the wife of a popular naval officer has encountered a new idea of great social importance. She was running on about society matters generally, when a gentleman remarked that a certain young lady possessed remarkably pretty cheeks, having that peculiarly lovely tinge of pink rarely seen among fashionable women, and which cannot be imitated by the brush.

“Oh pshaw! You men don’t know anything about it. The same effect is now produced with a syringe.”

“The syringe!” he exclaimed.

“Yes; why, don’t you know that fashionable women restore color in their cheeks by hypodermic injection? Thy have a small syringe, the same as used for administering an anesthetic, and with this they inject a coloring fluid beneath the skin. Peach-blow cheeks are very desirable, and if there is no blood there to make them, the minute veins can be forced full of coloring matter which answers for blood. The trouble is it is only temporary and will eventually injure the skin permanently. But what of that! Drunkenness is only temporary and will eventually ruin those who indulge so why sneer at the woman who wishes to look interesting for an hour? There are women I know who habitually resort to the syringe for their color. When the effect is gone—that is, when the coloring matter is absorbed in the skin and carried away by the blood—the face is absolutely ghastly. The skillful use of the instrument is quite disastrous. There are the daughters of admiral ------, both of whom use it. By nature they haven’t a particle of color. One of them—well, if you ever see her you will see a sight! I mean if your ever see her in daylight. The coloring matter forced into the chees has been taken up in the glands beneath the eyes and carried into the end of the nose. She looks like—like—what do you call it? Yes, and old ‘bum!’ It is too funny for anything! There’s the other difficulty, don’t you see, you can’t tell where the color is going to finally show up.


Reprinted from National Police Gazette, November 6, 1886.