No. 479
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
July 14, 2020

Bloody Duel over a Woman.

November 19, 2013
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Patrick Eugene Joseph Prendergast, a madman who assassinated the mayor of Chicago, was hanged on this date in 1894. Prendergast seems to have been a mentally unbalanced character from his early childhood; one might speculatively attribute it to a youthful head injury, or the very early death of his father, or the strains of an […]
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Executed Today - 7/13/2020

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Soapy Smith in July 4th paradeSkagway, Alaska 1898Broadway and Fourth Ave.Note Soapy is on the left of center, behind Joe Brooks.Behind him is Brooks' Pack TrainWhere is the Skaguay Military Company?Where is the Fitzhugh Lee wagon?Courtesy ofKlondike Gold Rush National Historical Park (Click image to enlarge) ow Soapy Smith conned his way to be Grand Marshal of the 4th of July With
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Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 7/10/2020

Rhynwick Williams In March 1788, a London woman named Maria Smythe was standing on a friend's doorstep when a stranger suddenly accosted her, muttered some unrecorded but evidently horribly vile comments, stabbed her with a knife, and fled, leaving her slightly wounded. Although she had no way of knowing it at the time, she was the first victim of a bizarre crime spree that would not be
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Strange Company - 7/13/2020
It was a perfect weekend to journey out to Tyngsborough to get a glimpse of what was left of the …

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Lizzie Borden: Warps and Wefts - 6/13/2020
On the morning of March 19, 1875, Charles K. Landis entered the office of the Vineland Independent and demanded to see the paper’s editor and publisher, Uri Carruth. When Carruth entered the room, Landis approached him, waving a newspaper clipping. “Mr. Carruth, did you write that?” Landis shouted. “I did, and I will do it again,” said Carruth. “Will you promise not to attack my wife
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Murder By Gaslight - 7/11/2020

In 1976, the 92 acres of landfill that would one day become Battery Park City was in place and ready. Unfortunately New York City—which hoped this new development would help revitalize the lower West Side of Manhattan—was too broke to get construction started until 1980, according to bpcparks.org. So until the early 1980s, an actual […]
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Ephemeral New York - 7/13/2020
[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
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Early American Crime - 2/7/2019
Uncle Sam's Thanksgiving Dinner. | The Tewksbury Almshouse.

Bloody Duel over a Woman.

Bloody Duel

J. Williams and A. Jabes, two Salt Lake City, Utah, Men, carve each other in a frightful manner. [more]

James Williams, a Salt Lake Utah gambler and Albert Jabes, a hack driver, recently engaged in a sanguinary fight using razors as weapons, over the affections of a fallen woman. Both were gashed in a most fearful manner, and it is probable that their wounds will prove fatal. Jabes was cut immediately over the carotid artery and Williams received an awful gash penetrating the membrane of the windpipe, and narrowly escaping severing that member. The faces of both were literally slashed to pieces, the flesh hanging in ribbons, leaving scarcely any resemblance to human beings, but that both were not killed in the encounter is a miracle. The woman over whom the fight occurred had been for a long time the paramour of Jabes, but she recently transferred her allegiance to Williams. By means of a pass key Jabes entered the room where Williams and the woman were sleeping, crazed with liquor and jealousy, and intent on having the life of his rival. He was armed with a razor as sharp as it could be made. With the ferocity of a fiend he began mercilessly gashing the man who had supplanted him, and fearfully wounded Williams. After some moments the latter wrested the razor from his assailant and retaliated with terrible effect.


Reprinted from The National Police Gazette, November 12, 1892.