No. 436
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
August 20, 2019

Love in a Railroad Car.

September 16, 2012
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Photo of Cindy Weber in the "Red Deer Advocate," October 23, 1981, via Newspapers.com Every missing-persons story is tragic, of course. However, I know of few such cases that are both as heart-breakingly sad and utterly peculiar as the following disappearance. It reads like a psychological horror movie, with an almost Fortean ending. People inevitably called Cynthia "Cindy" Weber of
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Strange Company - 8/19/2019

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By Jo Anne Giovino with photography and research by Barbara Morrissey and Kristin Pepe *(All rights reserved, August 2019) Although …

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Lizzie Borden: Warps and Wefts - 7/31/2019

The hanging, and then posthumous beheading and head-spiking, of the Virginia slave Abram lacks any firmer primary date than the signature given this Richmond newspaper report that was later widely reprinted in the young United States. (Our text here hails from the Hartford, Conn. American Mercury, September 18, 1800.) A HORRID MURDER. Capt. John Patterson, […]
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Executed Today - 8/19/2019
Jeff and Joe Soapy Smith buries Joe Simmons The Illustrated Police News April 9, 1892 (Click image to enlarge) oe Simmons was a tall, slender gambler known to many as “Gambler Joe” Simmons, a member of the Soap Gang who managed Soapy Smith's Tivoli Club in Denver, 1890, and Soapy's Orleans Club in Creede, 1892. According to William Devere’s poem "Two Little Busted Shoes," Simmons
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Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 3/25/2019
(sic) Mary Catherine Anderson—Katie to her friends—was in good spirits when she went out the evening of Monday, February 7, 1887. 16-year-old Katie Anderson was a domestic servant living at the home of her employer, Stat Colkitt on his farm in Mount Holly, New Jersey. She said she was just going out for a walk, but Katie was not seen again until Tuesday morning when a neighboring farmer found
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Murder By Gaslight - 8/17/2019

The neighborhood surrounding St. Mark’s Church on Second Avenue and 10th Street owes its charm to the descendants of the Stuyvesant family. These were the great-great grandsons and granddaughters of Petrus Stuyvesant, the director-general of New Netherland from 1647-1664. In the late 1700s and early 1800s, these Stuyvesants lived in stately houses on land that […]
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Ephemeral New York - 8/19/2019
[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
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Early American Crime - 2/7/2019
"Four Aces." | A One Legged Baseball Club.

Love in a Railroad Car.

Love in railroad car

Mrs. Flo Smith, a young and handsome Newport, KY., Woman, caught in a compromising position with her paramour in an empty passenger car. [more]

“If you give me away I’ll kill you!”

The speaker was a handsome Newport, Ky., woman stylishly attired, and the party addressed was the night watchman at the Cincinnati, Lebanon and Northern Railroad yards. The woman’s wild talk and dramatic gesticulations attracted the attention of a large crowd. Naturally the guardian of the peace was somewhat awed at the startling admonition, but contrary to her expectations, he was not cowed down even a little bit by her wild and maddened theatrics. He simply told her to close her mouth and go on about her business, lest she get in to further trouble. The cause of the woman’s threats toward the officer naturally was inquired into, and it is briefly given below:

On the previous night, about 11 o’clock, the watchman in making his rounds through the C. L. and N. yard heard a rustling sound in one of the vacant passenger cars which was standing on the side track. He proceeded to investigate and cautiously open the door of the coach. He could discover noting until the rays of his lamp were cast between two seats in the middle of the car. Here he beheld a man and a woman in a compromising position.

The woman’s companion hastily arose and jumping over the seats managed to escape from the car. The woman, however, was not so fortunate and was caught by the watchman, who recognized her as Mrs. Flo Smith of Fourth and Monmouth Streets, Newport, Ky. She pleaded pitifully to be allowed to go home, and her request was finally granted. Her companion, who got away, was recognized by the watchman was recognized as a fellow who hangs around the vicinity of the C. L. and N. depot.

The mission of Mrs. Smith to the above-named locality was to put a quietus on the tongue of the watchman.

 

From The National Police Gazette, October 7, 1893