No. 500
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
December 04, 2020

A Terrible Scare.

July 8, 2014
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 "The Witches' Cove," Follower of Jan MandijnIt's time for this week's Link Dump!Call your friends!What the hell caused a mass tree fall in Washington state?What the hell was the Grafton Monster?What the hell happened to William Hare?What the hell happened to Alfred Beilhartz?What the hell happened to Ann Bonny?A recently-discovered site may be the oldest known temple.A curious courier.The first
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Strange Company - 12/4/2020

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Youth With Executioner by Nuremberg native Albrecht Dürer … although it’s dated to 1493, which was during a period of several years when Dürer worked abroad. November 13 [1617]. Burnt alive here a miller of Manberna, who however was lately engaged as a carrier of wine, because he and his brother, with the help of […]
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Executed Today - 11/13/2020

News photographer George Bain spent much of his career taking photos of New Yorkers going about everyday life—and that included prepping for and celebrating Christmas. In the captions of these 1910s photos, he didn’t explain where these trees started out before they were apparently dumped at Chambers Street, most likely, where the Erie Railroad had […]
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Ephemeral New York - 11/30/2020
Colorization can sometimes add another whole dimension to vintage black and white photos. We’ve done this one of the crime …

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Lizzie Borden: Warps and Wefts - 8/31/2020
The morning of February 8, 1898, the nude, dismembered body of a man was found floating in the East River, near a ferryboat slip on Roosevelt Street, New York City. The entire front portion of the head was missing, leaving only the right ear and a portion of the back of the head. The left leg was missing from a point just above the knee and the right leg had been cut off at the hip. Both arms
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Murder By Gaslight - 11/28/2020

Thomas Marshall WordNov 7, 1857 - Feb 5, 1929(Click image to enlarge)    OAPY SMITH RELATED TO ONE OF THE VIGILANTES THAT HELPED END HIS REIGN! December 2009: Fred Wood contacted me as a descendant of Tom Marshall Word, one of the vigilantes that helped end the reign of Soapy Smith in Skagway, Alaska. That alone was very interesting, and I was very happy to hear from him, but at that time he
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Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 11/27/2020
[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
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Early American Crime - 2/7/2019
Tennis. | Independence Day in the Country.

A Terrible Scare.

Lunatic

A lunatic makes his escape from confinement and employs his energies in divesting ladies of their hair; Louisville, Ky.[more]

Three Young Ladies Frightened by a Lunatic.


At Louisville the other evening about seven o’clock a well-dressed young man, about eighteen years old, made his appearance on Preston street, between Jefferson and Green, and suddenly started after a lady walking along the pavement with a baby in her arms. The lady ran, and he pursued her across the street, where she entered her gate. The villain or madman, as it was unable to decide at the time, then ran across to the west side of the street and started in pursuit of three young ladies, who were coming down the street. The ladies ran screaming until they reached a three-foot alley between Mr. Peter Stark’s house and an adjoining saloon. They ran to the back end of the ally, and into the saloon. The man rushed in right on their heels, and grabbed one of the young ladies by the hair, threw her violently on the floor. In almost an instant, however, Mr. Stark and the gentleman in charge of the saloon, attracted by the screams of the terrified girls, ran in and caught the lunatic by the arms and released the prostrate lady. She was almost frightened to death, and could hardly walk or speak. The two gentlemen started to the First street station house with the young man, but met Officers Ryan and Darling on the way, who took charge of the captive and conveyed him to the station where he gave his name as Youse, a false name. A short while afterward his brother, who had heard of the occurrence, came to the station house and informed the officers that the young man was non compos mentis and irresponsible for his actions.


Reprinted from The National Police Gazette, October23, 1880.