No. 463
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
February 28, 2020

Dan Creedon in Training.

June 4, 2013
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"The Witches' Cove," Follower of Jan Mandijn It's time for this week's Link Dump! Let the show begin! Angkor Wat and the collapsed reservoir. Shorter version: Jack Parsons was one weird dude. Jolly Jane Toppan, the last person you would want at your sickbed. A museum that's pure torture. The mystery of the Breton inscription. The posset: good for whatever ails you. Yet
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Strange Company - 2/28/2020

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Fifty-nine years ago in February 1961, thousands of avid fans trudged through 20 inches of snow to Carnegie Hall to see comedian Lenny Bruce—in a show that was recorded and released in a three-record set, The Carnegie Hall Concert. This famous show, “was the moment that an obscure yet rapidly rising young comedian named Lenny […]
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Ephemeral New York - 2/23/2020

(Thanks to India revolutionary Bhagat Singh — himself soon to become an Executed Today client — for the guest post. It was originally published under the title “Blood Sprinkled on the Day of Holi Babbar Akalis on the Crucifix”. -ed.) ON THE DAY OF HOLI, FEBRUARY 27, 1926, WHEN WE were getting high on our […]
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Executed Today - 2/27/2020
Beginning on January 1st, W&W will begin featuring fascinating short clippings from the Fall River papers and other newspapers from …

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Lizzie Borden: Warps and Wefts - 12/29/2019
Nellie C. Bailey. William Dodson led a drive of 2300 head of sheep from Kansas through Indian Territory to their new home in Texas in October 1883. A mile behind them the owner of the new ranch, a widower named Clement Bothemly, and his sister Bertha traveled in a wagon outfitted with bedrooms. Pulled by two yoke of oxen, the wagon was so large that observers compared it to a railroad car.
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Murder By Gaslight - 2/22/2020

Letter to Mary from Jeff R. Smith II Artifact #63 February 15, 1897 Jeff Smith collection (Click image to enlarge) rtifact #63 Soapy Smith's letter to wife Mary, dated February 15, 1897 reads, in a large pen hand, Feb 15th 1897 Dear Wife This far on my journey to the North God bless you Jeff Owl Saloon Spokan A quick note from husband to wife, written on Russ House
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Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 2/27/2020
[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
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Early American Crime - 2/7/2019
Jos. Schlitz Brewing Co. | Undercover Lunatic.

Dan Creedon in Training.

Dan Creedon in TrainingThe plucky Australian Middle-weight punches the bag at his quarters near St. Louis, Mo. [more]

Dan Creedon, whose portrait appears in this issue of the Police Gazette, is the middleweight champion of Australia, and s matched to fight Bob Fitzsimmons, middleweight champion of the world, at 154 pounds for $5,000 and the championship of the world in the Olympic Club, New Orleans. Creedon is a clever and scientific boxer, a hard hitter, and possesses great stamina. He has fought numerous battles in Australia, and came to this country with the title of middleweight champion. Since his arrival from Australia he has engaged in many glove contests—the most important one being with Alec Greggains of San Francisco. They fought for $9,000 at Roby, Ind., on Aug. 14 1893. Greggains had quite a reputation and many booked him to defeat Creedon. The latter displayed great generalship and tremendous hitting power and after fighting fifteen rounds, according to “Police Gazette” rules, in 55 minutes he knocked Greggains out. Creedon’s victory over Greggains gained him quite a reputation and Col. J. D. Hopkins the popular theatrical manager and backer, issued a challenge to back Creedon to fight Bob Fitzsimmons for $5,000 a side at the same time posting $500 forfeit. Fitzsimmons did not pay any attention to the challenge and Creedon gave up all hope of ever meeting the former until the present match was arranged. Creedon is now training near St. Louis, and from the latest advices form his backer he was in first-class condition and confident of winning.

 


Reprinted from The National Police Gazette, September 22, 1894.