No. 511
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
March 01, 2021

What Led to a Divorce.

May 20, 2013
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 "The Witches' Cove," Follower of Jan MandijnThis week's Link Dump is here!Party time at Strange Company HQ!Who the hell was Edward II's very secret lover?What the hell are the Skara Brae artifacts?The "Worst Woman on Earth."Marguerite of France, twice a queen.Hundreds of people die defending the Ark of the Covenant.  In 2121.A brief history of the British Women's Police Service.Government mind
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Strange Company - 2/26/2021

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Surprising news broke tonight of the listing for sale of the popular bed & breakfast, open as a business for …

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Lizzie Borden: Warps and Wefts - 1/10/2021

Soapy Smith - "street fakir"The Daily NuggetJanuary 28, 1882Tombstone, Arizona     STREET FAKIR WAS WORKING THE 'SOAP RACKET'" It's been a number of years that we've known that Soapy Smith went to Tombstone, Arizona. I knew that he operated swindles there, likely the prize package soap sell racket, but never had any solid provenance, until now. Good friend, author, and Tombstone historian,
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Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 2/25/2021
Youth With Executioner by Nuremberg native Albrecht Dürer … although it’s dated to 1493, which was during a period of several years when Dürer worked abroad. November 13 [1617]. Burnt alive here a miller of Manberna, who however was lately engaged as a carrier of wine, because he and his brother, with the help of […]
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Executed Today - 11/13/2020
 On a road outside of Norristown, Pennsylvania, on October 28, 1896, Frank Mancil and his daughter came upon an agitated man shouting, “Murder! Help!” The man was bleeding from his arm, and, in a buggy nearby, a woman lay prostrate.The man, Charles O. Kaiser, Jr., told Mancil that he and his wife Emma had been attacked by highwaymen who shot them both then left with their watches and her purse
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Murder By Gaslight - 2/27/2021

After John Sloan and his wife left Philadelphia and relocated to New York City in 1904, the couple lived first in Chelsea and then in various places in Greenwich Village, where Sloan also took a studio at Sixth Avenue and Cornelia Street to create art that found “beauty in commonplace things and people,” as he […]
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Ephemeral New York - 2/22/2021
[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
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Early American Crime - 2/7/2019
Undercover Lunatic. | Baseball Animals.

What Led to a Divorce.

What led to a divorce.

A newly made benedict discovers the name of a former lover of his wife’s on her ankle, and makes it the basis of a suit or divorce; Galveston Tex. [more]

What a Husband Discovered, and How a couple were separated.

The pretext which a man naturally jealous will find to keep the fire of family discord up to a white heat is forcibly illustrated in the case of a man who shortly after his marriage made a discovery in the morning on arising which ruined his domestic peace forever. Previous to her marriage his wife had another suitor, who was ‘the only man on earth” to her. While the tattooing mania was at its height, she testified her love for her lover by having his name pricked on her ankle. Subsequently the engagement was broken off, and they parted forever. She solaced herself, however, a short time after by giving her affections to another, and was rewarded by obtaining a husband. The latter was of a very jealous nature, and construed every act into inconstancy on her part. But the worst of all was when he discovered the name of the former lover where it had been printed. After that noting could prove to him the she was rue. He harped continually on the subject. A divorce is wanted to end the misery.


Reprinted from The National Police Gazette, October 30, 1880.