No. 465
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
April 07, 2020

Gambler Vs. Cook.

James Toohey, a Covington, Neb., scullion, gets awfully mad and fatally stabs a man about town named
April 18, 2016
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John Gavin/Gaven, a 15-year-old who had been transported from England just months before, hanged at Fremantle on this date in 1844. This was the day between Good Friday and Eastern Sunday, and Gavin was the first European executed in the new settlements of Western Australia. Working as a farmhand, Gavin yielded to an impulse to […]
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Executed Today - 4/6/2020

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Epidemics can shape the way a city develops. And it was an outbreak of a lethal disease that helped create the Greenwich Village that’s been part of the larger city since the 1820s. In the 17th century, the village of Greenwich was a mostly rural suburb of farms and estates (below, Aaron Burr’s home, Richmond […]
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Ephemeral New York - 4/5/2020

Entire article Seattle Daily Times Aug 19, 1898 (transcribed below) (Click image to enlarge) he looked her trouble in the face and did not hesitate to go into the camp of his enemies." The following is an interesting newspaper clipping discussing Mary Smith's (Mary Eva Noonan) trip to Skagway, Alaska to settle her husband's (Jefferson Randolph "Soapy" Smith II) estate. She knew
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Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 4/6/2020
Beginning on January 1st, W&W will begin featuring fascinating short clippings from the Fall River papers and other newspapers from …

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Lizzie Borden: Warps and Wefts - 12/29/2019
Robert Hoey told police that as he was coming home from work in the early hours of March 15, 1898, he literally tripped over the body of a dead woman in the courtyard of the tenement where he lived at No. 27 Monroe Street in New York City. An autopsy revealed that the woman had been strangled to death and the police believed that the body had been dragged to the courtyard known in the
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Murder By Gaslight - 4/4/2020

"Morning Post," March 17, 1823, via Newspapers.com Sometimes, people voluntarily confess to having committed heinous crimes; usually due to a bad conscience and a desire to make some amends. However, some confessions are fake. These are generally the result of genuine delusions, a perverse form of masochism, or just a desire to create a sick hoax. There are, more rarely, instances
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Strange Company - 4/6/2020
[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
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Early American Crime - 2/7/2019
The Kissing Quadrille. | Floating Circus.

Gambler Vs. Cook.

Gambler vs Cook

James Toohey, a Covington, Neb., scullion, gets awfully mad and fatally stabs a man about town named Erwin. [more]

A gambler named Erwin entered the saloon of M. Tiernes at Covington, Neb., recently, and walking up to James Toohey, a cook, knocked him down twice. Toohey rushed into the kitchen, and returning with a huge butcher’s knife, attacked Erwin. During the fight the cook drove the blade through the gambler’s heart, it coming out at the back and sticking into the floor as Erwin fell. There were threats of lynching, and Toohey was taken to Dakota City for safety. No trouble had existed between the men previous to the tragedy so far as is known.


Reprinted from National Police Gazette, January 4, 1890.