No. 483
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
August 04, 2020

A Brooklyn Romance.

A young girl hurled from a Fulton ferry-boat, New York, by a jealous wife, who passes the act off as an accident.
March 12, 2019
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The Web of Arachne by Fernand Le Quesne (1856 - 1932) Colorized by Curtis Byrne (Click image to enlarge) HE WEB OF ARACHNE COLORIZED. It's great to see what this painting may have originally looked like.      As I recently hung my framed print of The Web of Arachne, by Fernand Le Quesne (1856 - 1932), in my new place, I wondered why the artist didn't colorize it? Then I
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Soapy Smith's Soap Box - 8/4/2020

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“Beach Scene,” by Samuel S. Carr, is your portal into what people looked like when they visited a pristine, boardwalk-free Coney Island in 1879. It won’t be long before placid beach scenes like this are replaced by throngs of city residents looking for fun and adventure, and Sodom by the Sea is born.
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Ephemeral New York - 8/3/2020

Chicago Defender, Aug. 11, 1928. Former Negro Leagues baseball player James Hugh Moss was electrocuted in Georgia on this date in 1928, along with a white man named Clifford Thompson. The threesome of Moss, Thompson, and Thompson’s wife Eula, were Prohibition bootleggers from Etowah, in eastern Tennessee. A year before almost to the day (August […]
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Executed Today - 8/3/2020
You have to admire the energy and endurance of those Victorian ladies.  Even in the sweltering heat of a July …

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Lizzie Borden: Warps and Wefts - 7/24/2020
On January 6, 1873, Edward Stokes was sentenced to hang for the murder of financier and railroad magnate James Fisk. Stokes was well-connected politically and he awaited his appeal in a comfortably furnished cell in the Tombs with meals catered by Delmonicos. Stokes was granted a new trial, was convicted of manslaughter and senteneced to six years in Sing Sing prison. Read the full story here
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Murder By Gaslight - 8/1/2020

"Philadelphia Inquirer," November 16, 1919, via Newspapers.com Mary Ann Louisa Taylor (or, as she was known to her many fans, “Marie Empress,”) was a well-known actress of the silent film era. Her sultry good looks brought her much success in the “vamp” roles which were so popular in that period. She was also a talented singer, dancer, and male impersonator. Unfortunately, none of her
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Strange Company - 8/3/2020
[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
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Early American Crime - 2/7/2019
Practical Devotion. | Fashion's Fillies.

A Brooklyn Romance.

A young girl hurled from a Fulton ferry-boat, New York, by a jealous wife, who passes the act off as an accident.

Brooklyn romance always takes queer sensational shapes, and here is the latest. On the 2d inst., at 5 P. M., two ladies came tripping down the bridge at Fulton Ferry after the gates had been closed and when a crowded boat was just leaving the slip. The stouter of the two stepped aboard first, and when her slender young companion attempted to follow her she interposed and delayed so that the girl had but a slight foothold on the moving boat. Then turning suddenly she gave a sly push that tumbled her companion overboard. The girl fell into the water, rigged just as she was in the height of the spring fashion. A wild excitement prevailed on the boat, and was not allayed until it was seen that the bridgemen of the ferry had fished the young woman with a boat-hook, limp, wet, insensible but, safe. The lady who had been her companion found a private coach of the most "tony" description waiting for her at the ferry on the Brooklyn side, and entering it was driven away without any inquiry being made. A scandal is said to underlie this event. The stout lady, it is rumored, is the jealous wife of a prominent physician, and the ducked young beauty was guilty of flirting with the sawbones and falling under suspicion of doing something worse.


Reprinted from National Police Gazette, June 10, 1882.