No. 499
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
November 26, 2020

The Terrific Leap at Niblo’s Garden, From an Aerial Apparatus.

The original and daring aerial representation by Thomas Hanlon, now performed by him every evening a
January 11, 2016
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A CHAMPIONSan Francisco ChronicleOctober 12, 1898(Click image to enlarge)     ASCOMB IS A CHAMPION    Guess Bascomb Smith wasn't all bad. The texts of the newspaper appear below.  Miss Hall finds a champion. Brother of  “ Soapy” Smith claims her as his wife.There is another side to the pathetic story told to the police by Minnie Hall, the Vaudeville actress to jump into the bay from Howard
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It’s been a good century or so since New Yorkers celebrated Evacuation Day. But in the late 18th and 19th centuries, this holiday—on November 25—was a major deal, marked by festive dinners, parades, and a deep appreciation of the role the city played in the Revolutionary War. Evacuation Day honors the day in 1783 when […]
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Ephemeral New York - 11/23/2020
Colorization can sometimes add another whole dimension to vintage black and white photos. We’ve done this one of the crime …

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Lizzie Borden: Warps and Wefts - 8/31/2020
 Old Cap. Collier, the fictional dime novel detective, tries his hand at solving the murder of Dr. Cronin.The real murder of Dr. Patrick Henry Cronin was stranger than fiction, with the good doctor found naked and dead in a Chicago sewer after confronting the corrupt leaders of an Irish secret society. As Edmund Pearson said, “It was one of those murders over which men nod their heads and look
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Murder By Gaslight - 11/21/2020

Youth With Executioner by Nuremberg native Albrecht Dürer … although it’s dated to 1493, which was during a period of several years when Dürer worked abroad. November 13 [1617]. Burnt alive here a miller of Manberna, who however was lately engaged as a carrier of wine, because he and his brother, with the help of […]
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Executed Today - 11/13/2020
[Editor’s note: Guest writer, Peter Dickson, lives in West Sussex, England and has been working with microfilm copies of The Duncan Campbell Papers from the State Library of NSW, Sydney, Australia. The following are some of his analyses of what he has discovered from reading these papers. Dickson has contributed many transcriptions to the Jamaica Family […]
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Cowboys Lassoing the Ballet. | Pugilistic Females.

The Terrific Leap at Niblo’s Garden, From an Aerial Apparatus.

Terrific Leap

 

The original and daring aerial representation by Thomas Hanlon, now performed by him every evening at Niblo's Garden. [more]

It is very seldom that we have to chronicle such a feat as that which we illustrate in our present number, and which is nightly performing at Niblo’s Garden. It is universally acknowledged as being the chef d’oeuvre of gymnastic genius. Although no description can do justice to it, we will endeavor to give our readers some idea of Thomas Hanlon’s magnificent daring. He first performs many gymnastic feats, perfectly marvelous, with and upon six sticks connected together and swinging in the air. He hangs by the nape of the neck, by the toes, by the knees, in every possible attitude leaping and winding through the sticks or short ladder and recovering his balance with great adroitness. Every gymnast will bear witness that, considering the many chances of falling which the acrobat runs and against which no skill can guard, this is beyond question the most terrifically dangerous exhibition ever seen in New York. The enthusiastic delight with which it has been received by crowded houses and applause, shows that its danger as well as the skill displayed were fully appreciated.

After thus astounding this audience, he suddenly darts from the slender platform, and taking a terrific leap, grasps a rope at least twenty feet distance, which hangs form the rigging loft of theatre, and after swinging on it for some short time, lets himself down on the stage. This appalling act of labor and ingenuity must be seen to be appreciated; the most elaborate description sounds tame after witnessing it, and when seen it takes the breath away from the spectator, since, should he miss his hold nothing could save him from instant destruction. It is undoubtedly the boldest, the most reckless gymnastic feat ever attempted.


Reprinted from Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, January 28, 1860.