No. 448
Crime, Eccentricity, and the Sporting Life in 19th Century America.
November 13, 2019
Rogue's Corner: GEORGE MILLIARD (138)
GEORGE MILLIARD
alias: MILLER
PICKPOCKET, BURGLAR
Description:
Forty-four years old in 1886. Born in United States. Married. Saloon keeper, Slim build. Height, 5 feet 7 inches. Weight, 118 pounds. Brown hair, blue eyes. light complexion, bald on front of head. Generally wears a full black beard. Has an anchor in India ink on right fore-arm.

Record:
MILLIARD is an old New York pickpocket, burglar, and receiver of stolen goods. He formerly kept a liquor saloon on the corner of Washington and Canal streets, New York, which was the resort of the most desperate gang of river thieves and masked burglars in America.

Milliard was arrested in New York City on January 5, 1874, in company of John Burns, Big John Garvey (now dead), Dan Kelly, Matthew McGeary, Francis P. Dayton, Lawrence Griffin, and Patsey Conroy (now dead), charged with being implicated in several masked burglaries. One in New Rochelle, N. Y., on December 23, 1873; another at Catskill, on the Hudson River, on October 17, 1873, and one on Staten Island, N. Y., in December, 1873, about a week after the New Rochelle robbery. The particular charge against Milliard was receiving stolen goods, part of the proceeds of these burglaries. He was tried in New York City, convicted, and sentenced to five years in Sing Sing prison on February 13, 1874. The other parties arrested with him at the time were disposed of as follows:

Dan Kelly, Larry Griffin, and Patsey Conroy were each sentenced to twenty years in State prison for the New Rochelle burglary on February 20, 1874.

Burns was sentenced to sixteen years in State prison for the Catskill burglary on October 23, 1874.

Big John Garvey (now dead) was sentenced to ten years in State prison in NewYork City on June 22, 1874.

McGeary was discharged on January 13, 1874.

Dayton was put under $1,000 bail for good behavior on January 13, 1874.

Shang Campbell, John O'Donnell, John Orr (now dead), and Pugsey Hurley (88), were also arrested in connection with these burglaries, and sent to State prison.

Since Milliard's discharge he has been traveling through the country picking pockets with Jimmie Lawson, alias "Nibbs" (137), and a Chicago thief named Williard. He is considered a first-class man, and is known in all the principal cities in the United States. He has been arrested several times, but manages to escape conviction.

His picture is a good one, taken in August, 1885.
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Source:
Byrnes, Thomas. Professional criminals of America. New York, N.Y: Cassel, 1886.